Nouvelle traduction d’une grande oeuvre littéraire

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La traduction littéraire est très différente de la traduction technique, mais si vous vous intéressez au sujet en général, en tant que professionnel ou simple amateur de lecture, je viens de découvrir une nouvelle intéressante dans un article de la presse canadienne :

Une nouvelle traduction du célèbre livre Alice au pays des merveilles est disponible.

Plus d’informations ici : https://www.lhebdojournal.com/une-traduction-d-alice-au-pays-des-merveilles-signee-par-une-trifluvienne/

 

Le métier de traducteur juridique

Vous recherchez un professionnel de la traduction pour prendre en charge vos documents de nature juridique ?

Le Village de la Justice a publié un article qui pourra vous intéresser:

http://www.village-justice.com/articles/traduction-juridique-enjeu,9051.html

Voici un point à retenir:

Traduire un contrat anglais en français implique de passer du droit anglo-saxon au droit romain, et consiste à faire coïncider les principes des deux systèmes, parfois éloignés.

Atouts indispensables :

Connaissances techniques et pointues

Maîtrise des langues concernées (texte source et texte cible)

Compétences rédactionnelles de haut niveau

 

The Translation Nightmare Before Christmas in Strasbourg, France

Claimant to the title of « capital of Europe », the French city of Strasbourg is known all over Europe for its institutions like the European Council where hundreds of translators and interpreters help politicians communicate. But it is also the self-proclaimed capital city of Christmas, known all over the world for its numerous markets and its exquisite local food.

Located close to the German border, Strasbourg is part of the « Alsace » region where German is probably the most commonly spoken language after French and the local dialect « l’alsacien ». You’d think that language skills would be quite developed in such an international place. Yet, I spotted a funny translation blunder in a hotel in the city centre. As is sometimes the case, hotel owners resort to Google Translate when they only have a few words to translate (ex: instructions in the bathroom), either for financial reasons or just practical considerations. They probably think that given how short these sentences are, the machine cannot get them wrong… well, in this case a proofreader would have been put to good use… Granted, the message can still be well understood, but I reckon it’s not ideal and it reflects poorly on their image. When it’s bound to be pinned on the wall, it’s always best to have it proofread first.

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But don’t let yourself be put off by the wrong grammar and get outside to soak in the magic and explore the numerous Christmas markets. Start with the one located in the borough called « La Petite France ». There, you’ll find the traditional half-timbered houses. Keep on walking and you’ll finP1520911ally end up in « Place Gutenberg » where they usually host a Christmas market honouring a European country. It changes every year.

It’s very close to the impressive cathedral where there is yet another Christmas market. Don’t forget to stop by the visitors’ centre. You can’t miss it, it is located in the building with massive gingerbread decorations.

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And for all the fairy-tale lovers out there, under no circumstances whatsoever should you miss the boutique called « La maison de Hanssen & Gretel ». It is like stepping in a life-size dollhouse filled with Christmas decorations and magic. It’s located in a narrow street close to the cathedral.

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The most famous Christmas market remains the one called « Christkindelsmärik » in the pure German tradition. Don’t forget to sample some of the local food there! Anything with German-sounding names is bound to be delicious!

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AUSIT’s Biennial National Conference ’14: Transition into the Future

Last month, I attended AUSIT’s Biennial National Conference which was held in sunny Brisbane, Australia. It was a very interesting 2-day event where I had the opportunity to meet and hear from colleagues from the other side of the world. There was an impressive line-up of highly-qualified, recognised practitioners who gave insightful presentations and workshops.

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There were many seminars to choose from, including Media Translation: Practices and Expectations”, and Practical aspects of legal translation: the translation of an Italian land sale contract.” Among the several workshops offered, I particulary enjoyed: “Best practices for the translation of official documents” by Susanne Creak, as well as What’s the context? Interpreting, Translation and the Law” by Heather Glass.

It was great to meet and get to know fellow colleagues. As always, conferences are always a great opportunity to network and have challenging conversations about our jobs (translation and/or interpreting).

What’s more, I really appreciated the talk from Brett Casey et Cynthia Cave, a fascinating and funny team specialised in sign language. Their presentation Deaf Professional and Interpreter – A team” was absolutely delightful and entertaining on top of being very informative.

Looking forward to the next national conference in 2016! 🙂

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Regional Languages & Bilingual Complaints

According to the Penarth Times, the town council of Penarth (Wales, UK) will have to translate its Summer and Christmas festival brochures into Welsh after receiving complaints, including from the Penarth Welsh Language Society. Read article here.

The Welsh Language Act 1993, which the town council is subject to, states that organisations must prepare a Welsh language scheme that ensures both English and Welsh are treated equally in public services.

It shows that offering English-only communication isn’t necessarily a great option. Companies, town councils, among others should cater to other linguistic needs. Preserving language diversity is important. As there is a Welsh medium school in Penarth, it does make sense to develop materials in the local language to make sure that the language can be used and practised is all parts of life, not just within the walls of schools.

Did you know that Icelandair, Iceland’s main airline, has implemented a unique program to promote its language to tourists? The airline uses every opportunity to teach its passengers about the national language. From the moment you use the entertainment system to your own cushion, you can learn some Icelandic words.

Promoting local languages is a great way to boost tourism, upgrade your image and offer a one-of-a-kind experience. Think of Ireland. Isn’t it absolutely lovely and authentic to soak in the true Irish culture when visiting a small town where even road signs are written in Irish? After the era of mass consumption, there is now a move back to authenticity and uniqueness. For more info on that new phenomenon, read my previous article about Translation in the Retail Industry about highly personalised offers.

Translation in the Retail Industry

I recently translated a fascinating presentation about the major changes happening in the retail industry. Although it appears to be all about mobile technology, personalised recommendations and entertainment, the major X factor for successful application is language/communication, and the shadow counterpart: translation.

A Globalised Market | Offering Multilingual and Localised Content

With the advent of the Internet and, more recently, mobile technology, consumers can now purchase products and services anywhere, anytime, from the comfort of their homes, using their mobile phones while at work or during their commute. Options are limitless.

Now many companies take the virtual route, anyone in the world can access their online shops. They can potentially reach anyone on the planet with an Internet connection. But, being able to approach new clients is one thing. Being able to communicate with them is another, a major factor that can make or break sales.

Thanks to surveys, it is now known that Internet users prefer to purchase on a site that provides content in their own language. Offering multilingual websites is really important. You will see the benefit on your bottom line, provided that you used the services of a professional linguist.

The era of brick-and-mortar looks dead and gone? Think again!

The Age of Entertainment and Personalised Services

Physical shops arent’s going anywhere. They simply need to adapt to the new market and the changes in the way consumers purchase items. Mass production is rapidly losing its appeal, and it is now all about offering highly personalised, targeted and bespoke services/items.

Marketing professionals are now trying to figure out what individuals will want and need in the near future. They even possess the tools and algorithms to cater to these needs on a much deeper level. Thanks to predictive personalisation, social media and mobile technology, they can create highly bespoke offers. Using apps and geofencing, they can boost their sales and drive people to purchase goods they weren’t considering buying. Retail 2.0 is here and ready to take your retail experience to new heights!

In order to attract clients in brick-and-mortar shops, creative directors have their work cut out for them. They are now completely rethinking the way products are displayed (magical worlds for kids, etc.), the types of services offered (WiFi lounge, kids playground, coffee lounge, etc.), the way products are available (showrooms, etc.) among other things.

The world is the retail industry’s oyster. And to further its expansion and changes, language and translation will be a crucial part of the process.

Translating your Press Releases is Crucial to your Global Footprint

If you’re wondering whether it’s a sound decision to translate your press releases, please read on. You’ll see how crucial it is for you to translate this type of content in several languages, including French (a language used worldwide).

Good PR vs Bad PR

Your PR communication greatly helps boost your visibility, your sales and your image. Without it, chances are nobody would know who you are, what you sell and why people should choose you over your competitors. As we live in a society of round-the-clock news, it is paramount to be heard and visible in the media (TV, radio and social media). But, you shouldn’t make the mistake of communicating in English only.

To ensure the widest coverage possible, you should know that offering multilingual content is necessary.

English Only Is Overrated

Did you know that search engines categorise content according to the language used? Also, people are more likely to read your PR releases if they’re offered in their very own language (remember this famous quote from Nelson Mandela: « If you talk to a man in a language he understands, that goes to his head. If you talk to him in his language, that goes to his heart »).

Although English is widely spoken, especially among journalists, it is no guarantee that all nuances and references can be understood by non natives. Remember that reading in a foreign language requires extra effort and everybody can make mistakes when interpreting your content.

To ensure that foreign journalists use your PR content, and pass along your message worldwide, you need to address them in their own language.

Offer content that they can be readily used, copied, pasted and talked about.

Don’t let journalists translate the content themselves. You’d run the risk of mistranslations and a potential PR nightmare!

A Sound Investment

Competent and reliable translators aren’t cheap but it is a very sound investment for your company. Your message needs to be accurately conveyed from the start. Think of all the translation-related disasters that forced some companies to spend millions on new campaigns to repair the damage! Think of the companies that are now having difficulties entering certain markets because of communication and language blunders!

As a conclusion, the cost of damage control could certainly be far greater than hiring a professional translator.